​Sample Thermal Images

Some sample thermal images (with annotations added using FLIR Tools) are provided below in the form of screenshots from the generated PDF report. We can see that the FLIR ONE Pro is able to track temperatures ranging from -17C to 150C.

​Freezer Compartment

Refrigerator Compartment

Ceiling from Staircase Base in a Dark Room

​Child

​Notebook under Use

Composite Deck in the Sun

Open Flame on a 16000 BTU Natural Gas Cooktop Burner

We can also see the versatility of the FLIR Tools app, which allows tracking of multiple regions in the deck sample above. The ceiling shot (in the dark) also shows the wooden rafters standing out in the thermal image. Temperatures are fairly accurate, with the human skin temperature correctly being identified.

Usage Impressions Concluding Remarks
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  • nathanddrews - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    That's really cool, glad to see prices getting cheaper and the tech getting better!

    Want to educate me on why they are generally limited to 9fps? Are they considered regulated spy equipment if they go faster than that?
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    It's export control related (US ITAR); but I suspect it's more about limiting their effectiveness as weapon sights not espionage that's responsible for the limit.

    http://www.flir.se/cvs/cores/knowledgebase/index.c...
    Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    Yeah, it is like GPS, if it is for consumers, it has got to suck. Otherwise someone might use to to bring down murrica. Reply
  • Samus - Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - link

    That's awesome these are finally affordable. Super useful for hobbyists. Especially radio control and automotive. Reply
  • ShieTar - Thursday, June 8, 2017 - link

    It could also be driven by the bolometer concept. Instead of counting photons, like a CMOS or CCD sensor does, you measure the temperature of the pixel after it has reached a thermal equilibrium with the scene that is imaged onto the sensor. Due to this differences, it is more difficult to make a bolometer fast (you need very small thermal mass, i.e. very thin and fragile pixel) than to make a photon-sensor fast.

    You can find some explanation on this topic on the FLIR homepage as well:

    http://www.flir.de/science/blog/details/?ID=74352
    Reply
  • Threska - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    The most obvious disadvantage is having an expensive piece of kit hanging off a flimsy USB port. Reply
  • skavi - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    USB C ports are actually generally quite solid. Reply
  • SharpHawk - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    So how accurate is it? Reply
  • JanW1 - Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - link

    My thought exactly. What good is it if the pictures are good looking but inaccurate? Does anyone believe a 16000 BTU Natural Gas Burner actually stays at a max of 150°C for any significant amount of time? Any chance of a comparison with images taken by the Seek and with measurements from a thermocouple? Reply
  • peevee - Thursday, September 14, 2017 - link

    150°C is the upper limit of the device itself. Reply

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