X570 Power Delivery Specification & Comparison

One of the most talked about aspects of any high-end motherboard lately is the quality of its power delivery system. At a high level, all X570 motherboards have to adhere to a couple of factors, the most important of which is support for the upcoming Ryzen 3950X 16c/32t processor. This means manufacturers needed to work even harder in creating suitable and efficient power delivery systems to ensure full compatibility with the Ryzen 3000 series.

Meanwhile, we're also keeping a look out for any cases where manufacturers may be embellishing their power delivery claims, advertising a board as being more capable than it really is. After some bad history and what has happened in the last two years there, we hope to (and expect) to see less of that with the X570 chipset.

As power delivery is usually one of the most requested items for any of our motherboard content, prior to the launch we reached out to all the motherboard vendors to find out what power delivery systems each of their new X570 boards are equipped with. Below is a table of the official information we have compiled from each of the vendors, with a question mark (?) denotes when we don't have information available.

Please note that this information is self-reported, so until we can review any given X570 board, we're operating on the honor system, trusting vendors to supply honest and upfront information. And we will be checking, and we will be keeping this page up-to-date as more information becomes available.

X570 CPU Power Delivery Comparison
Motherboard Controller H-Side L-Side Chokes Doubler
ASRock X570 Aqua IR35201
(6+2)
IR3555
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
ASRock X570 Creator IR35201
(6+2)
IR3555
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
ASRock X570 Taichi ISL69147
(6+2)
SIC634
(12)
SIC632A
(12)
12 ISL6617A
(4)
ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming X ISL69147
(6+2)
SIC634
(12)
SIC632A
(12)
12 ISL6617A
(4)
ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 UP9505PQGW
(4+2)
UP1962SD
(8)
8 UP1961SQ
(4)
ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3 ISL69147
(4+2)
ISL99227
(8)
8 ISL6617A
(4)
ASRock X570 Steel Legend ISL69147
(4+2)
SIC634
(8)
SIC632A
(8)
8 ISL6617A
(4)
ASRock X570 Extreme4 ISL69147
(4+2)
SIC634
(8)
SIC632A
(8)
8 ISL6617A
(4)
ASRock X570 Pro4 UP9505PQGW
(4+2)
UP1962SD
(8)
8 UP1961SQ
(4)
ASRock X570M Pro4 UP9505PQGW
(4+2)
UP1962SD
(8)
8 UP1961SQ
(4)
ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Formula ASP1405I
(7+1)
IR3555
(14)
14 -
ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero ASP1405I
(7+1)
IR3555
(14)
14 -
ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Impact ASP1405I
(7+1)
TDA21472
(8)
8 -
ASUS Pro WS X570-Ace ASP1405I
(7+1)
IR3555
(12)
12 -
ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming ASP1405I
(6+2)
IR3555
(12)
12 -
ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming ASP1106G
(4+2)
Sic639
(12)
12 -
ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming ASP1405I
(6+2)
TDA21472
(8)
8 -
ASUS TUF X570-Plus ASP1106G
(4+2)
Sic639
(12)
12 -
ASUS Prime X570-Pro ASP1106G
(4+2)
Sic639
(12)
12 -
GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Xtreme IR XDPE132G5C
(14+2)
TDA21472
(14)
14 -
GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master IR XDPE132G5C
(12+2)
IR3556
(12)
12 -
GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Ultra IR35201
(6+2)
IR3553
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Pro/WIFI IR35201
(6+2)
IR3553
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
GIGABYTE X570 I Aorus Pro WIFI IR35201
(6+2)
TDA21472
(6)
6 -
GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Elite ISL69138
(6+1)
Vishay DrMOS
(12)
12 SL6617A
(6)
GIGABYTE X570 Gaming X ISL69147
(5+2)
ISL6625A
(10)
10 SL6617A
(5)
MSI MEG X570 Godlike IR35201
(7+1)
TDA21472
(14)
14 IR3599
(7)
MSI MEG X570 Ace IR35201
(6+2)
IR3555
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
MSI Prestige X570 Creation IR35201
(6+2)
IR3555
(12)
12 IR3599
(6)
MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WIFI IR35201
(5+1)
QA3111N6N
(10)
10 IR3598
(5)
MSI MPG X570 Gaming Edge WIFI IR35201
(4+2)
S4C029N
(8)
S4C024N
(8)
8 IR3598
(4)
MSI MPG X570 Gaming Plus IR35201
(4+2)
S4C029N
(8)
S4C024N
(8)
8 IR3598
(4)
MSI X570-A Pro IR35201
(4+2)
S4C029N
(8
S4C024N
(8)
8 IR3598
(4)

As we get more information from vendors or reputable sources, we will update the table. As we get more and more X570 boards in for review, we can go deeper into the analysis in each individual review over the upcoming months.

The AMD X570 Chipset, What's New? ASRock X570 Aqua
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  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    3950X will work in plenty 4xx chipset motherboards. OC'd 3950X will be a bit more hit and miss, go look up some google docs for VRM specs on reddit. And a lot of 4xx boards offer BIOS flashback support. So if you want, there are a lot of 4xx boards with easily available BIOS support and 16 core support in the future for under or around $100. I'm still debating if I want the extra 3.0/4.0 speed for my NVMes. I already have one 3.0 one and want another one for data. 4xx boards only have 1 x 3.0 and 1 x 2.0 in my range (mATX). X570 is a lot better there. And I'm still looking for how much memory speeds are determined by chipset/board/CPU. I think Ryzen 3000 should hit an easy 3600 MHz even on B450 motherboards for example. Decisions, decisions. :D Reply
  • shing3232 - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    3950X power requirement is the same as 3900X,and 3900X works on B350. I am pretty sure it would work on X370 with Bios update. Reply
  • Irata - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I think the combination of complaining about expensive boards + wanting to get the highest end (most expensive) 16C Ryzen is a bit unusual.

    The good thing is that there is choice ? Want to go the cheap route ? Go for 3xx board. Want the "bestestest" - now you can buy a $1000 board to go with your Ryzen CPU. And everything in between is also covered.
    Reply
  • eva02langley - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    It is more related to the active cooling for the chipset that raise my concerns. If the fan die, it can become really troublesome fast. Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Unless you happen to have an older Ryzen or Carrizo lying around, there could be a problem to get older boards with an up-to-date BIOS.

    Had similar issues a year ago when RAM was so expensive, I had to recycle DDR3 for Kaby Lake CPUs using Z170 motherboards that only has Skylake support. Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge and Haswell CPUs I had galore, but Skylake only as notebooks. I wound up buying a Sky Lake i3, which I then returned for a full refund after I had updated the motherboards.

    Didn't feel good about it, wasn't given a choice either.

    These days some dealers offer a BIOS upgrade service, but at €40 it pretty much eats the 3. + 4. generation benefit.

    I want 10Gbase-T or rather NBase-T. Currently that means mostly Aquantia 107, of which I have 4 already. Those are €88 a piece, but when I look at these x570 prices, they charge a 300% premium for what's essentially a low-cost chip.

    And then I hear rumors, that there is actually 10Gbit Ethernet or in fact 100Gbit Ethernet already on-die, both in the CPU chiplet and the x570 chipset variant: For IF Ethernet is simply another protocol to run on the fabric and all you need is PHY.

    It is rather unfortunate that sane CPU prices, sane SSDs and sane RAM only mean that motherboard vendors are hoping to cash in big-time.

    I can see how they would be hungry. But I don't have 'waste money' around to feed them.
    Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Asus boards have a "BIOS flashback" feature whereby if you plug in a flash drive with a new BIOS to a specific USB port and press a button on the IO panel, the board will auto-flash itself with that BIOS - no CPU is needed, just power to the board. Reply
  • Targon - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Almost all MSI motherboards have BIOS flashback, and the Asus ROG Crosshair series also has BIOS flashback where you don't need a CPU or RAM in order to flash the BIOS. Most Asus motherboards do NOT have BIOS flashback capability. Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    when they get PCI4 support Intel's boards will be equally more expensive than the previous generation. Maintaining that high frequency a signal across more than a cm or 2 requires building boards to a much higher and more expensive standard or active signal booster chips along the path.

    PCIe 5 will be far worse on that front. Estimates I saw earlier this year were that PCIe4 would add as much as $100 to the price of a board; with the cheapest x570 boards being almost $100 more than the cheapest x470's on Newegg and the average (excluding the crazy halo ones) looking like it's at least $50 higher that doesn't seem too far off. That article (ee times asia???) was predicting that PCIe5 could end up adding as much as $400 above the cost of a 3.0 capable board; which if true probably means it will end up server only or with only a narrow strip between the CPU and chipset build up to that standard. (Assuming the latter possible anyway: If the cost challenge is more preventing external interference than in needing higher quality materials a local board segment fudge might not be feasible.)
    Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    PCI4 and 5, or for that matter IF will trigger rethinking motherboard layouts and form factors.

    "The [Enthusiast] motherboard" dates back to 1981 or the dawn of the IBM Personal Computer, and physics are catching up everywhere, even on the motherboard.

    Distance has a huge impact on speed, latency and power, so 'flat' and 'square' are both the first obstacles and the first who need to compromise. In the future every milimeter of distance between the die carrier and your point of interest will need to be paid for, in energy/time or extra switching silicon.

    Linear extrapolations of the past have little use, when the barriers are exponential.
    Reply
  • TheUnhandledException - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Even if you keep the board a square moving the CPU and chipset to the center of the board and having PCIe slots on either side would cut the trace to the furthest slots in half. Reply

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